Home ENGLISH ARTICLES Israel and Greece in the aftermath of Oct. 7 – Amid the war in Gaza, the new Hellenic-Israel relationship is weathering its first crisis

Israel and Greece in the aftermath of Oct. 7 – Amid the war in Gaza, the new Hellenic-Israel relationship is weathering its first crisis

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Israel and Greece in the aftermath of Oct. 7
Israel and Greece in the aftermath of Oct. 7

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Cypriot President Nikos Christodoulides (center) and Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis in Nicosia, Sept. 4, 2023. Photo by Amos Ben-Gershom/GPO.

Israel and Greece in the aftermath of Oct. 7

Amid the war in Gaza, the new Hellenic-Israel relationship is weathering its first crisis


GreekNewsOnDemand.com comments: Before you read the following PROPAGANDA article by the JEWISH site jns.org, read FIRST the following article we have published since the FAKE “Hamas” attack of Oct. 7th, 2023, because it will show you how the Israelis have been changing public opinion about themselves for decades by pulling of terrorists attacks that…THEY THEMSELVES DO VIA THEIR OWN AGENTS AND PROXIES! They did this with the Greeks, too, back in the ’80s whereupon the Palestinian terrorist Abu Nidal committed terrorist attacks on Greece and Cyprus which had as a result Greece switching alliances. They went from supporting Palestine to supporting Israel because…ISRAEL, via their AGENT ABU NIDAL (who worked FOR THEM), managed to changed these Greek nations’ opinion about both the Jews and the Palestinians!

BOMBSHELL: Terrorist Abu Nidal & Hamas founder Moses Hasan Yousef were BOTH Israeli Mossad assets!!!

BOMBSHELL: Terrorist Abu Nidal & Hamas founder Moses Hasan Yousef were BOTH Israeli Mossad assets!!!

From the Arab Platoon to Hamas: Israel’s “Abu Nidal” Strategy – How the Israelis have used terrorism to get Greece & Cyprus to support them! 

From the Arab Platoon to Hamas: Israel’s “Abu Nidal” Strategy – How the Israelis have used terrorism to get Greece & Cyprus to support them! 

BOMBSHELL – Netanyahu has been secretly working with Qatar to… FUND HAMAS!!!

BOMBSHELL – Netanyahu has been secretly working with Qatar to… FUND HAMAS!!!

War in Israel BOMBSHELL: Israeli Officials Met The Night BEFORE Hamas Attack – THEY Planned It, THEY Carried It Out With THEIR Operatives!

War in Israel BOMBSHELL: Israeli Officials Met The Night BEFORE Hamas Attack – THEY Planned It, THEY Carried It Out With THEIR Operatives!



READ NOW… 


Israel and Greece in the aftermath of Oct. 7

Amid the war in Gaza, the new Hellenic-Israel relationship is weathering its first crisis.

DANIEL S. MARIASCHIN
Daniel S. Mariaschin is the International CEO of B’nai B’rith.

On Sept. 1, 1982, Palestine Liberation Organization chairman Yasser Arafat stepped off the Greek cruise liner Atlantis, which had ferried him and some of his inner circle from Beirut to a marina just south of Athens. He had been exiled by Israel’s invasion of Lebanon earlier that year.

He was warmly welcomed on the dock by Greek Prime Minister Andreas Papandreou and some of his Socialist Party colleagues. Sailors in a Greek naval honor guard stood at attention as Arafat and Papandreou walked side by side on their way to a luncheon in the Palestinian’s honor.

Papandreaou gave a brief statement to the press: “We welcome with great emotion the great fighter for the cause of the lost fatherland and freedom of his people.”



This warm greeting of Israel’s foe came as no surprise. In November 1947, Greece had been the only European country to vote against the United Nations partition plan that created both a Jewish and an Arab state. For decades after, it reliably supported the Arab camp on issues affecting the Arab-Israeli conflict. At the time, there were extensive Greek communities in Arab cities, where Greek merchants were part of the middle class and contributed to economic ties with those countries.

But the Greeks in Alexandria, Cairo, Benghazi and Khartoum were gradually forced to leave. By 1990, Greece became the last European country (other than the former Yugoslav republics and Albania) to establish full diplomatic relations with Israel, under Prime Minister Konstantinos Mitsotakis, father of the current prime minister.

For its first half century, Israel had a far more important relationship—politically, economically and militarily—with Turkey than with Greece.

The Israel-Greece relationship has changed dramatically since the establishment of diplomatic ties in 1990. The story goes that a chance meeting in 2010 between Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou (son of Andreas) at a Moscow hotel, propelled by good personal chemistry, led to a turnabout in the official Greek worldview of Israel and its place in the Eastern Mediterranean neighborhood.



Behind the personal chemistry of two leaders lie five economic, political and security factors that have nudged relations to another level.

First, Israeli-Turkish relations began to sour, most dramatically as a result of the 2010 Mavi Marmara incident.

Second, potential natural gas partnerships emerged. Talks are ongoing about exporting Israeli natural gas via a short pipeline to a power station in Cyprus that would be connected with Greece and Europe by undersea electricity cable. Meanwhile, an Anglo-Greek corporation, Energean, acquired in late 2016 full ownership of two of Israel’s offshore gas fields (Karish and Tanin), as part of the Israeli government policy of diversifying ownership of Israel’s offshore gas assets. Production in Karish began in October 2022.

Greece was not the only country to support Israel’s right to self-defense in those first few weeks of the military campaign in Gaza. But as the fighting wore on, the early and unequivocal European support began to slip.

Mitsotakis’s stance mirrored a number of his European counterparts. On Nov. 9, he said in an interview with Politico that, speaking “as a friend of Israel,” while there was no question that Israel had the right to defend itself, “how it does actually matters, and it matters considerably.” He was concerned about “proportionality” in Israel’s response to the Hamas attacks. Israel’s allies, he stated, “must speak hard truths” about its “aggressive” military campaign in Gaza.



In an interview in January at the Davos World Economic Forum, Mitsotakis again supported Israel’s right to defend itself but caveated that “we are increasingly concerned about the plight of innocent people in the Gaza Strip.”

He went on to say that Greece was deeply involved in creating humanitarian corridors and other means for aid to be delivered. “We are considered to be honest brokers. We talk to everyone,” he said.

The prime minister’s careful wording reflects Greek public opinion. One early poll in the Greek City Times had over 65% of those responding saying Greece should remain neutral in the fighting. 18% held pro-Israel views, and 11.5% said Greece should support the Palestinians.

The new Hellenic-Israel relationship is therefore weathering its first crisis. The early visit of Mitsotakis to Jerusalem was an indicator of how far Greece had moved in its partnership with Israel, with which it has vital shared interests. That said, it should not have come as a complete surprise that Athens has stepped back from its unequivocal support of the early days of the war, as has much of Europe, albeit in a more muted and less abrupt way than Spain and Belgium.

In one important respect during the current war, the relationships with Greece and Cyprus delivered a tangible benefit for Israel. As many international shipping companies and airlines chose to avoid Israel’s ports and airports, the national assets Zim and El-Al—privately owned but subject to a degree of governmental control—kept the nation’s lifelines open by using Greece and Cyprus for logistical backup.

Thus, in October 2023, El Al and other Israeli carriers added flights to Athens (and Larnaca) to enable stranded Israelis to come home; and in March 2024 a senior delegation of Israel’s Tourism Ministry held talks in Cyprus about the construction of an Israeli-controlled port facility in Larnaca, that would serve as a backup for emergencies such as an attack on Haifa—in parallel with the role of Cyprus in supporting humanitarian supplies to Gaza. This reliance on Greece and Cyprus in wartime was envisioned early on by the architects of the tripartite alignment.

Thus, I’m wagering that on “the day after,” the shared interests will correct the diplomatic course to where things were on Oct. 6. The economic and security stakes are simply too high for these ties to go into reverse.

Originally published by The Jerusalem Strategic Tribune.

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